RF & Wireless

Antenna

An antenna (or aerial) is an electrical device which converts electric power into radio waves, and vice versa. It is usually used with a radio transmitter or radio receiver. In transmission, a radio transmitter supplies an oscillating radio frequency electric current to the antenna's terminals, and the antenna radiates the energy from the current as electromagnetic waves (radio waves). In reception, an antenna intercepts some of the power of an electromagnetic wave in order to produce a tiny voltage at its terminals, that is applied to a receiver to be amplified. (Source Wikipedia)

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RF Power Amplifier

An RF Power Amplifier (PA) is defined as a final active stage of an RF Power electronic transmitting system. PA can be designed as a small MMIC used to transmit lower power such as cellular hand-sets and other portable applications, or a large rack-mounted PA used in high power RF systems such as DVB-T Broadcast, Cellular/PCS Wireless Infrastructure and Defence applications like Radars. Most of the Power Amplifiers designs are customised and designed for specific applications like HDTV, GSM, Radar, Point-to-Point Microwave or LTE. Matching specific main attributes of PA Frequency Range, Gain (dB), Gain Flatness (dB), Supply Voltage (VDC), P1dB (dBm) and Package of the amplifier with the end equipment is the main task of the RF Designer.

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UHF - Ultra High Frequency

UHF is the most commonly used frequency bands for transmission of television signals. Modern mobile phones also transmit and receive within the UHF spectrum. UHF is widely used by public service agencies for two-way radio communication, usually using narrowband frequency modulation, but digital services are on the rise. Narrowband radio modems use UHF and VHF frequencies for long range data communications e.g. for supervision and control of power distribution networks and other SCADA and automation applications. There has traditionally been very little radio broadcasting in this band until recently. The Global Positioning System also uses UHF

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WLAN - Wireless Local-Area Networks (Wireless LAN)

Wireless local-area networks (WLAN or wireless LAN) use radio waves to connect a user device to a LAN, which extends an existing wired local area network. WLAN provides Ethernet connections over the air and operates under the 802.11 family of specifications developed by the IEEE. WLANs are built by attaching a device called the access point (AP) to the edge of the wired network. Clients communicate with the AP using a wireless network adapter similar in function to a traditional Ethernet adapter. The WLAN technology is defined by the IEEE 802.11 family of specifications, namely, 802.11, 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g and 802.11n. All use the Ethernet protocol and CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Avoidance instead of CSMA/CD) for path sharing.

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